Sprout Gives You Wings

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We are so excited to announce that our first Sprout Collective member to sell her amazing patterns is Mainsail Studio. The first of three wing patterns (Dragons and Faeries are coming soon!), these gorgeous butterfly wings come in sizes Pixie to Adult.

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Pixie fits American Girl dolls and small pets, and the S, M, and L sizes are perfect for babies to older kids. Dress up isn’t just for Halloween anymore!

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For a limited time, until Sunday, April 17 at Midnight EDT, we have a special treat for you! Create a Mainsail Studio wings project and then sew it together with kids or friends and get out from behind that computer and GO OUTSIDE! Just use the code ESCAPE to get 20% off any and all wings, no limit! What are you waiting for?

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The New Spoonflower April Design Challenge

This post is a direct copy from the Spoonflower blog

We are delighted to partner with Sprout Patterns to bring you our April Design Challenge, the first in our new series of month-long challenges. Spoonflower + Sprout are looking to the members of our amazing creative community to find the perfect Japanese Garden-inspired design for a new sewing pattern release!

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Sprout Patterns is a new service that allows you to combine indie sewing patterns with Spoonflower designs to create customized cut and sew projects. Sprout takes away the work of tracing a sewing pattern onto fabric and lets you truly enjoy the process of making your own garments and accessories.Our Japanese Garden Design Challenge is designed to inspire fabric designs for the launch of Named Clothing’s Asaka Kimono pattern, the first in this patternmaker’s lineup available through Sprout. The winner receives $100 in Spoonflower credit and $100 in Sprout Patterns credit, and their design will be featured in all photos for the launch of Named Clothing’s Asaka Kimono pattern on Sprout and in a press release.

The rest of the top ten receive $50 in Spoonflower credit and $50 in Sprout credit.

We’ll also be giving away $50 in Sprout credit to one lucky winner who enters our drawing! Click the button below for more details. Screen Shot 2016-04-04 at 3.57.57 PM.png

A Whale of a Good (Sewing) Time

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“To boldly go where no one has gone before”

Familiar words to fans of a certain iconic television show, and also my motto when venturing forth into my newest sewing project, the Moneta Dress from Sprout! I am somewhat new to the world of sewing, and by sewing, I mean sewing properly. Much to the chagrin of the professional costume designers who taught me to sew, I rarely measure, never use a pattern, and generally just plunge into a project while vaguely hoping for the best. It is safe to say that my creations often end up being garments strictly to wear inside the house with the blinds closed.

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When I first saw Colette Patterns Moneta Dress on the Sprout website, I knew this challenge was one worth undertaking. I immediately loved the fit-and-flare silhouette, the pockets, and the customizable aspect of the sleeves and collar. I chose our new Cotton-Spandex Jersey, but struggled to find a print I truly adored until I stumbled onto Galaxy Whales, by Wildnotions.

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Rich jewel tones are my favorites, and as a child I wanted to be (and this is completely true) an astronaut AND a whale surgeon. Eventually settling on the sleeveless option with the adorable crossover collar, I was ready to begin!

Much to my delight, the colors on the screen translated beautifully to fabric. No tracing patterns, no grain lines to wrangle, and I was pleased as punch to have it cut out and ready to go in less than 15 minutes. I chose a lightweight navy jersey for the bodice lining, and sewed the lining and bodice together using a standard zig-zag stitch to account for the stretch allowed by the Cotton Spandex Jersey.

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In the span of a couple hours, the dress was cut out and assembled, with only the collar left to attach. When I attached the bodice to the skirt, I ruched the skirt rather than inserting elastic to cinch the waist. Colette Patterns offers a free collar variation add-on to the Moneta Dress so that you can customize the dress even further! Scrolling through the designs, I chose the tie collar. Luckily for me, I was able to fashion my new collar then and there, as I had ample extra fabric from the Sprout design.

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Although the downloadable instructions from Colette specify that the collar should be lined with interfacing, I had to do without this time, but I think the results were definitely satisfactory!

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New collar vs old collar!

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As it was the first dress I had ever made completely on my own, I was definitely a little nervous to see how the finished project looked. With great trepidation, I squirmed into the finished dress. I was pleased to see that it was really quite lovely! This was a great starter project for someone like me who was a touch uncertain about undertaking a semi-complex garment, and I’m thrilled with how well it turned out! Thanks to Sprout, the ease of the entire process, and its delightful end product, was reassuring for this novice seamstress. My dress is completely custom, fits like a glove, and was simple to make. Emboldened with my success, I’ve already ordered another Sprout pattern!

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Claire.jpgClaire is one of Spoonflower’s warehouse operations specialists. Though she is a sociologist by schooling, her love of artistic creativity and environmental sustainability led her to Spoonflower, where she is surrounded by like-minded people. An exercise aficionado, she likes experimenting with Spoonflower’s stretchy fabrics, especially the sport lycra. When she’s not at the gym, you can find her playing video games, planning her next big trip, or trying to find her new favorite restaurant.

 

Interview with Adrianna of Hey June Handmade

Today’s interview is with the beautiful and very talented Adrianna—the owner and designer behind Hey June Handmade. She has three young daughters who were the inspiration for her to start sewing, co-writing a blog, and eventually venture into selling her own patterns. At Sprout  we carry the Biscyane Blouse, the Aurora Tee, the Lane Raglan and the oh-so-awesome Sloan Leggings and Paneled Sloan Leggings. She also has many more patterns on her site that you should definitely take a gander at. We love Adriana and are so happy she’s part of the Sprout Patterns Family!


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1. What led you to wanting to start designing your own patterns?

I think my original impetus was the fact that I was already making patterns for my own kids, and since I had three I only had to fill in a couple sizes to make a fully graded pattern. From day one when I started sewing I was always much more interested in the technical aspects of it and the patterns than the design/decorative side of things. I’m very left-brained and enjoy math and technical software, so this was a perfect fit.

This is why I love my customers and the sewing community, because I’ll make the most simple pattern and call it a day and then they will take it and make it into a creative art piece with their fabric pairings and decorative features like applique, stencil, iron-ons, trim, and pattern hacking. My brain doesn’t do that kind of thing naturally!

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Sloan Galaxy Leggings from Sprout Patterns

2. From your first inspiration for a new pattern to release how long does the process typically take?

That depends. My first pattern took 8 months because I was also teaching myself the software and I had a newborn. Lately it’s about 2 months. I could probably bring that down a little bit but I’m pretty anal about my patterns and I like to have a longer test period to really hash out the issues and allow for redrafts. Also I illustrate all my directions so that takes several days.

I hope to be able to produce patterns slightly quicker or at least with more regularity, but you’ll never see me push them out in a week or two.  Once you see the testing call for a new pattern, you can be assured that I’ve been working on it behind the scenes for at least 6 weeks.

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The new Charleston Dress pattern made with Sew Caroline’s Chalk and Paint fabric

3. Have you ever started creating a new pattern then just completely abandoned it?

Yes, absolutely. I have two even sitting on my cutting table right now. There have been many various reasons. One time another designer released an identical pattern at the same time (that was a very bitter pill to swallow as I was almost completely finished and planned to release that week. I morphed that design and it became the Edelweiss, which I love, so it’s ok. I won’t do that again though because I think there’s plenty of room on the market for similar designs!). I’ve quit work on two patterns because I’m too slow and the seasons changed, but I’ll probably revisit those.  I also stopped working on one because I didn’t think the style or fit were very universal – it would’ve only fit a fairly specific body shape.

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The simple to sew and awesome to wear Lane Raglan

4. How would one get into learning how to draft patterns?

I bought some pattern drafting books and some textbooks (the ones by Aldrich are decent and available on Amazon) and read them cover to cover several times.  I also spent hours on the internet researching before I even began.  I wasn’t actively working toward being a pattern designer at the time, but now I see that all of that research and trial and error made it much easier to naturally morph into this line of work.  Pattern drafting was always fascinating to me, so even if I wasn’t sewing anything at the time, I’d get on the computer and think, hm, I wonder how you would even make a collar like that!  Then I’d look it up and I’d compare it with my drafting books to figure it out.

Eventually, the math and physics behind drafting starts to make sense and you can predict what needs to be done to draft a garment or solve a fit issue.  I recommend something very simple to start with, like making your own perfect tee shirt pattern.  There are virtual classes for drafting on websites like Craftsy that you can take, and several local quilt shops also offer classes in beginning drafting.

SBCollage1.jpgAdrianna in a Biscayne Blouse she made using Sprout.

5. There seems to be a saturation of sewing bloggers (and really talented ones), pattern makers, fabric sellers, etc. How would someone enter the “sewing world” and differentiate? What is the sewing community lacking that it doesn’t have now?

Oooh that’s a good and very tough question. I don’t know if I can speak very much to the differentiation bit – I think you just need to let your true self shine through in your blog posts/designs. People (me included) really like transparency and feeling like they’re seeing the real person behind the brand. In terms of just getting started, I would do all the obvious things – join individual pattern designers’ groups and make their stuff and post like crazy in the group. Post finished projects from patterns on your blog and then blow up social media with links. Start doing hacks or tutorials for altering the patterns and then you can eventually approach bigger bloggers or designers to do guest posts or be a part of blog tours. In terms of what the sewing community is lacking…geez. that’s tough. If you find it, you’ll probably have success!

Allie is doing something amazing with IndieSew and providing a one stop shop for really quality indie sewing patterns for women. Before she did that, there were other reseller sites, but nothing quite the same. If there’s something in particular that really interests you, delve deep into that niche. A few that come to mind from the past that started out as fun ideas and turned into big events or even their own websites are Kids Clothes Week, Sew Geeky, Spring Top Week, Sew the Show, and Film Petit.

Moneta Madness is Here

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Moneta what? MONETA MADNESS! This year we’re hosting a special event for the entire month of March. Together with Colette Patterns we are offering  20% off any and all Moneta Dressess. Just use the discount code MONETAMADNESS as many times as you like.

To take part in the tournament, just share an image on Instagram with the hashtag #MonetaMadness. You may take a photo of either your printed Sprout Patterns project, or the sewn dress, but the Sprout tag must be visible in the photo. On March 31st we will choose 4 finalists who will each win a $100 Gift Certificate to Sprout!  Not too shabby!

Need some inspiration? Check out the amazing Moneta projects already created on Sprout, or design your own!

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FREE SHIPPING for 24 hours

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A Leap Year is a pretty special thing, so we’ve decided to celebrate with free shipping at Sprout Patterns. That’s right – for 24 hours, between 10am EST Monday, February 29th and 10am EST Tuesday, March 1st all orders, both domestic and international, will have free shipping.

Is there a catch? Not at all. Just use the code LEAPYEAR at checkout to take advantage of the offer. Have fun and get Sproutin’!

 

2 for 1 Fat Quarter Patterns

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Just in time for gift-giving season, we’re having a special on Sprout Studio’s fat quarter patterns—the Lined Zipper Pouch and the Holiday Stocking. Buy one, get one free or 50% off—however you like to think about it!

Fiber Monday starts at 10am EST Monday, Nov. 30, and ends at 10am EST on Tuesday, Dec. 1. Just use the code “FIBERMONDAY” at checkout. No need to hold back, there’s no limit on how many projects you can create.